2017 Oscars Delivered Social Media Spontaneity for Celebrity Marketing

Despite last-minute excitement Super Bowl LI and the 2017 Oscars displayed, it’s evident traditionally pinnacle television events are not strongly impacting young audiences.

With a 4% viewership drop from 2016, the 2017 Oscars experienced its third consecutive viewership decline, marking 32.9 million viewers as the second lowest Nielsen viewership since 1974. The ABC broadcast continued the trend of low millennial appeal, bringing a 9.1 rating in comparison to 2016’s 10.5 rating in the advertiser-friendly 18-49 demographic.

Ratings may not tell the show’s entire story. This year’s show accrued a reported $115 million in ad revenue, likely to be the most lucrative entertainment event all year.

Largely, this is thanks to socially relevant personalized messages and strong celebrity influence in key Oscar associated brands.

Host Jimmy Kimmel did an incredible job of appealing to a younger demographic using social media. Echoing Meryl Streep’s Golden Globe political stance, Kimmel effectively live-tweeted President Trump, including “#MerylSaysHi”. This unexpected political and celebrity interaction stirred over 1.37 million responses via Twitter. This interaction was instant and memorable.

Kimmel also added an experiential event by inviting a group of unsuspecting Hollywood tourists to the ceremony, nearly crashing Twitter with tweets about a goofy tourist from Chicago named Gary. Unanticipated events, when paired with the right social influencers, brought millennials and Gen Zers to brands surrounding the show.

The political message spots such as the New York Times’ “The Truth is Hard” or Hyatt’s “For A World of Understanding” mirrored the active social voice of the show very effectively. According to a Brandwatch report, peak social media mentions came at the time when social issues were discussed during Viola Davis and Gael Garcia’s speeches.

However, being political doesn’t always define brand success, nor does it have to.

For high end brands who align with the affluent viewer base of the Oscars, it is important to have a strong celebrity influence within the brand’s message. Rolex, the official sponsor of the 2017 ceremony, implemented an impressive array of Hollywood icons into their one-minute spot “Celebrating Cinema”. The one-minute spot coincidentally featured the late Bill Paxton, triggering an immense amount of unanticipated brand awareness. This surprise appearance created a flood of positive social media responses, proving that timely nostalgia is a powerful theme with the Oscar viewer base.

The traditional means in which showcase events appeal to their expansive viewer base is evolving. No longer can traditional television be the bottom line goal. As seen in the Super Bowl’s first ever live ad spot and the Oscar’s live-tweeting frenzy, younger audiences appreciate an experience above all else.

That personalized experience is truly memorable when spontaneity and celebrity influence can effortlessly combine.

photo credit: www.flickr.com

How to Target In-Demand Celebrities Who Match Gifting Goals for Celebrity Marketing

gifting pic

Four strategies to increase celebrity gifting results.

Gifting is the act of giving a brand’s products to high-profile, trend setting celebrities. The goal is for the celebrity to be seen with the gift, increasing brand awareness. This celebrity marketing tactic works best when there is either coverage of the celebrity using the product or when the celebrity talks about the gift with friends and news of it spreads through word-of-mouth.

The best way to ensure that celebrity gifting will have the desired effect is to identify your marketing goals and know what it takes to achieve them.

Here are four general objectives of celebrity gifting and strategies to help reach them:

Social Posts: If your goal of gifting is for the celebrity to take a picture or write a post about the gift, the best approach is to send gifts to celebrities within your budget or to those who will be most likely to sincerely enjoy the gift. Unfortunately, as social media has evolved, celebrities now expect to be paid for posts about gifts. The only time compensation is not needed is when the celebrity loves the product and has been using it a long time. Even then, some celebrities still ask for money.

Get it in the hands of influencers: Use the most direct line you have to the celebrity, whether that is their home or publicist’s address, to guarantee they will personally see the gift. As trend setters, just getting gifts in the hands of people with influence can have a big impact. Celebrities who truly like and/or use your product are much more likely to talk about it within their circle of friends and put the word out in interviews or on social media.

Make a brand image/statement: gift BIG. In order to make an impression on both the celebrity and the public, put together gifts that are bigger than life. Personal, creative and extravagant gifts will stand out to celebrities among the loads of other gifts they receive. With a unique gift, they will be more inclined to both talk about it with friends as well as post about it on their social media pages.

Get a picture placed in a publication: As explained in a previous post, set-up shots are pictures taken that look “real” but are actually coordinated on behalf of the brand. In order to create a good set-up shot, and have it appear in a publication, it is best to hire a specialized photographer who has expertise about which celebrities look good in the media right now and ones who can virtually guarantee a placement.

photo credit: Pixabay.com