2017 Oscars Delivered Social Media Spontaneity for Celebrity Marketing

Despite last-minute excitement Super Bowl LI and the 2017 Oscars displayed, it’s evident traditionally pinnacle television events are not strongly impacting young audiences.

With a 4% viewership drop from 2016, the 2017 Oscars experienced its third consecutive viewership decline, marking 32.9 million viewers as the second lowest Nielsen viewership since 1974. The ABC broadcast continued the trend of low millennial appeal, bringing a 9.1 rating in comparison to 2016’s 10.5 rating in the advertiser-friendly 18-49 demographic.

Ratings may not tell the show’s entire story. This year’s show accrued a reported $115 million in ad revenue, likely to be the most lucrative entertainment event all year.

Largely, this is thanks to socially relevant personalized messages and strong celebrity influence in key Oscar associated brands.

Host Jimmy Kimmel did an incredible job of appealing to a younger demographic using social media. Echoing Meryl Streep’s Golden Globe political stance, Kimmel effectively live-tweeted President Trump, including “#MerylSaysHi”. This unexpected political and celebrity interaction stirred over 1.37 million responses via Twitter. This interaction was instant and memorable.

Kimmel also added an experiential event by inviting a group of unsuspecting Hollywood tourists to the ceremony, nearly crashing Twitter with tweets about a goofy tourist from Chicago named Gary. Unanticipated events, when paired with the right social influencers, brought millennials and Gen Zers to brands surrounding the show.

The political message spots such as the New York Times’ “The Truth is Hard” or Hyatt’s “For A World of Understanding” mirrored the active social voice of the show very effectively. According to a Brandwatch report, peak social media mentions came at the time when social issues were discussed during Viola Davis and Gael Garcia’s speeches.

However, being political doesn’t always define brand success, nor does it have to.

For high end brands who align with the affluent viewer base of the Oscars, it is important to have a strong celebrity influence within the brand’s message. Rolex, the official sponsor of the 2017 ceremony, implemented an impressive array of Hollywood icons into their one-minute spot “Celebrating Cinema”. The one-minute spot coincidentally featured the late Bill Paxton, triggering an immense amount of unanticipated brand awareness. This surprise appearance created a flood of positive social media responses, proving that timely nostalgia is a powerful theme with the Oscar viewer base.

The traditional means in which showcase events appeal to their expansive viewer base is evolving. No longer can traditional television be the bottom line goal. As seen in the Super Bowl’s first ever live ad spot and the Oscar’s live-tweeting frenzy, younger audiences appreciate an experience above all else.

That personalized experience is truly memorable when spontaneity and celebrity influence can effortlessly combine.

photo credit: www.flickr.com

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Three Ways to Incorporate Celebrity Marketing via Pinterest’s Latest Experiential Tools

Now, with the roll out of a camera-based search engine for their 150 million unique monthly viewers, Pinterest positions itself among the elite social media celebrity marketing tools.

Considering the app’s niche approach to the marketplace, Pinterest has struggled to keep up with Snapchat and its innovative ad measurement technology.  70% of the company’s ad revenue came from the 11 major strategic marketing tools launched in 2016, propelling the app back into the forefront of innovative ad traffic measurement. Luckily for Pinterest, the number of advertisers using the app’s data offerings quadrupled by year’s end.

A majority of Pinterest’s marketing profit now hinges on tactics that are tailored for the app itself, differentiating Pinterest from its top competitors.

Pinterest recently introduced Lens, a mobile app that enables a phone’s camera to identify nearby objects and instantly display related items from Pinterest. The visual search technology is allegedly able to recognize 1 billion objects, allowing Pinterest users to ideally match any desired object in sight with a brand or product. With this type of experiential technology being added to the marketplace, it is certain that the younger user base that Pinterest has will immediately gravitate to the platform.

34% of Pinterest’s user base are millennials and older Gen Zers falling between the ages of 18-29, an age group that is highly receptive to visual and experiential marketing rather than traditional advertising means. For these younger users, once a trusted influencer is matched with a brand, the rest of the purchasing process is seamless.

Here are three ways Pinterest can have celebrities work with brands:

  • Keyword Campaigns:  Unlike the various other keyword campaigns that search marketers are accustomed to, Pinterest now has their ads posted as visual pins. Thanks to the app’s visual pin-saving structure, Pinterest can better understand how users are saving a celebrity’s interests. Pinterest can match celebrity interests with a designated brand and share that insight directly to advertisers through keywords. This allows the users, to in turn, intake promoted products at the utmost personal level.
  • Shop the Look: As an extension of Pinterest’s Buyable Pins program, which allows users to “pin” an item and purchase it right through the app, the ‘Shop the Look’ feature now allows Pinterest users to shop by pin preference. Macy’s, Nieman Marcus, and Wayfair are partnering with this innovative shopping filter, which opens up the floodgate for celebrities associated with those brands. Now if a user sees Adam Levine wearing Dior, they can simply”shop his look” and find products of similar brand, taste, and style.
  • Promoting blogs: Many celebrities have passions that align well with Pinterest’s theme of beauty, fashion, and home goods. Therefore, they also have the opportunity to promote brands associated with that interest. For example, Lauren Conrad promotes categories titled Primp, Wear, and Get Fit.  Many celebrity personal pins have products within them that are gifted from brands tailored to their unique interests, which drives an influx of traffic to those specific brands.  

While Pinterest may not possess the same universal social clout as Snapchat and Instagram Live, Pinterest has a unique opportunity to excite its niche user base with celebrity influencer interaction.

photo credit: https://c1.staticflickr.com

Super Bowl & Celebrity Marketing Brands Told Gen Z’s Story, Not Their Own

Many brands that welcomed the $5 million sticker price of a 30-second spot in Super Bowl LI implemented the tactic of timely nostalgia.

That reminiscent undertone didn’t merely attempt to tell the brand’s story–it attempted to tell the story of “you” the viewer.

The “you” for certain Super Bowl brands has been Gen X and Millennials. Capitalizing off of their 2015 double-digit growth, Audi tactfully destined itself for success with the 60-second spot that featured the late David Bowie’s “Starman”. The Audi spot “Commander” directly appealed to those that yearned for the sense of promise they were born with and had the purchase power to act on that feeling.

However, for Super Bowl LI the “you” for Super Bowl brands, had changed.

The “you” is now Gen Z.

This year Audi continued with their platform of nostalgic storytelling by chronicling a little girl in a homemade go-kart. Considering Audi has no women on their executive team, this year’s spot intended to accentuate social and economic gender equality, a theme that Gen Z is very passionate about.

Having been born between 1996 and 2010, early Gen Zers’ youth was marked by exposure to the economic struggle of the Great Recession. These individuals possess a mental and financial shrewdness that is forcing traditional brands to work with experiential creative tactics to become loyal users.

In 2016, Wildness, an L.A based firm that informs brands on the habits of Gen Zers, reported that 27% of teen Gen Zers created and shared original videos via social media on a weekly basis. Of the 3,000 polled, 84% had reported that they’d had some direct contact with a celebrity on social media.

This attention craving group craved that same attention from their Super Bowl brands in 2017 and Snickers effectively recognized that.

With a $44 billion spending power in the USA alone, Gen Z is the richest and most independent purchase influencer on the market. While Gen Z may not be ready to buy a luxury sports car, they will definitely buy a candy bar.

Well known for its playful “You’re Not You When You’re Hungry” campaign, the Mars brand has featured authority figures, such as Betty White, Joe Pesci, and Willem Dafoe. In its first full year, the campaign reported a 15.9% global sales increase and growth in 56 of the 58 markets in which it ran. While their current influencers may be older, the Mars winning creative formula should translate to Gen Z.

  1. Create a more compelling creative platform, on a large scale.
  2. Make the brand “iconic” with strengthened internal engagement and commitment.
  3. Relentlessly enforce a global approach.

Snickers attempted to appeal to Gen Z with the Super Bowl’s first ever live ad spot. Featuring a youthful influencer in Adam Driver, Snickers embarked on unprecedented experiential creativity. This revolutionary ad ran in the first break of the game’s third quarter, immediately keeping the attention of Gen Zers who tuned in for the halftime performance.

Driver was upset by the mayhem of the ad’s scene, which sparked excessive viewer anger and confusion. However, the Snickers spot was revealed to be an intentional faux with a follow up Adam Driver apology, which provided an effective call-to-action for fans to avoid their own hunger mishaps.

Regardless, live video will be a brand’s best friend in 2017 to connect to Gen Z, ensuring that they truly understand the immediate connection that makes Gen Z thrive.

Live streaming is exposing a brand’s vulnerability in a playful way. That is what Gen Z is gravitating to; immediate action with a level of spontaneity that makes the brand story feel as if it is their own.

photo credit: www.flickr.com