Celebrity Marketing Nostalgia Hits Home for Gen X and Millennials Alike

 

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In such an accelerated age, filled with anxiety and uncertainty, nothing stores more comfort than fond memories of the past.

According to a Harvard Business Review consumer study, nostalgia has proven to make consumers more willing to spend their money on consumer goods and services. Traditionally, the individuals who have the means to act on those feelings are parents falling in Generation X. However, with 16 million millennials now being parents, the appeal of connecting to a simpler time is expanding to a much wider audience.

In the advertising world, no fictional character resonates quite like Jon Hamm’s portrayal of Don Draper, the elusive star of Mad Men. In the show, Draper pitched a bold tagline to Heinz executives: “Pass the Heinz”. Rather than show ketchup, the creative would show food missing ketchup. Heinz’s current agency David Miami recognized this incredibly simple, yet genius concept and now have three ads running via the New York Post and Variety.

The conviction of Hamm’s Draper influenced Heinz’s creative approach, allowing them to connect to those who love the old Madison Ave style of advertising as well as the wide range of ages who fell in love with the show.

Revisiting a definitive era marked by beloved figures of the past enables consumers to relive the reason they first fell in love with the brand, creating positive brand association.

Domino’s has caught the nostalgic bug as well, having casted Stranger Things’ Joe Keery as Ferris Bueller, and Alan Ruck (aka Cameron Frye) in a cameo appearance, to promote the new Domino’s Tracker. By casting Keery in the Broderick role, the brand expanded to both Stranger Things and Ferris Buehler’s Day Off fandoms, cohesively meshing stories that multiple generations have fallen in love with. While nostalgic, the spot effectively targets a young tech savvy audience, showing that Domino’s can be delivered digitally via Amazon Echo or even with a waterproof watch.

AT&T’s latest campaign “Everywhere” focuses on how the magic of cinema is an experience, especially it is live-streamed. Beginning with an homage to Rocky, the creative further pays tribute to a laundry list of memorable titles including Cheers, Seinfeld, and Back to the Future.

Featuring David Hasselhoff and Big Bird, this campaign successfully unifies dated material to a product that is transcending the way consumers watch their shows. Bringing millennials and Gen X together isn’t simple, but having a unifying message with nostalgic A-list figures is certainly a good place to start.

To understand the correct way to implement brand nostalgia, it’s important to recognize potential pitfalls the tactic has with millennials. It’s crucial that nostalgia creatively ties back to topics that currently resonate with them, usually through an experience or activity. If the message doesn’t have a modern twist, nostalgic advertising’s success is brief and can be viewed as pandering by young viewers.

However, when a blast from the past is combined with a story or star that resonates with multiple generations, the old message becomes new again, revitalizing the brand in a simple yet effective way.

photo credit: www.pixabay.com

2017 Oscars Delivered Social Media Spontaneity for Celebrity Marketing

Despite last-minute excitement Super Bowl LI and the 2017 Oscars displayed, it’s evident traditionally pinnacle television events are not strongly impacting young audiences.

With a 4% viewership drop from 2016, the 2017 Oscars experienced its third consecutive viewership decline, marking 32.9 million viewers as the second lowest Nielsen viewership since 1974. The ABC broadcast continued the trend of low millennial appeal, bringing a 9.1 rating in comparison to 2016’s 10.5 rating in the advertiser-friendly 18-49 demographic.

Ratings may not tell the show’s entire story. This year’s show accrued a reported $115 million in ad revenue, likely to be the most lucrative entertainment event all year.

Largely, this is thanks to socially relevant personalized messages and strong celebrity influence in key Oscar associated brands.

Host Jimmy Kimmel did an incredible job of appealing to a younger demographic using social media. Echoing Meryl Streep’s Golden Globe political stance, Kimmel effectively live-tweeted President Trump, including “#MerylSaysHi”. This unexpected political and celebrity interaction stirred over 1.37 million responses via Twitter. This interaction was instant and memorable.

Kimmel also added an experiential event by inviting a group of unsuspecting Hollywood tourists to the ceremony, nearly crashing Twitter with tweets about a goofy tourist from Chicago named Gary. Unanticipated events, when paired with the right social influencers, brought millennials and Gen Zers to brands surrounding the show.

The political message spots such as the New York Times’ “The Truth is Hard” or Hyatt’s “For A World of Understanding” mirrored the active social voice of the show very effectively. According to a Brandwatch report, peak social media mentions came at the time when social issues were discussed during Viola Davis and Gael Garcia’s speeches.

However, being political doesn’t always define brand success, nor does it have to.

For high end brands who align with the affluent viewer base of the Oscars, it is important to have a strong celebrity influence within the brand’s message. Rolex, the official sponsor of the 2017 ceremony, implemented an impressive array of Hollywood icons into their one-minute spot “Celebrating Cinema”. The one-minute spot coincidentally featured the late Bill Paxton, triggering an immense amount of unanticipated brand awareness. This surprise appearance created a flood of positive social media responses, proving that timely nostalgia is a powerful theme with the Oscar viewer base.

The traditional means in which showcase events appeal to their expansive viewer base is evolving. No longer can traditional television be the bottom line goal. As seen in the Super Bowl’s first ever live ad spot and the Oscar’s live-tweeting frenzy, younger audiences appreciate an experience above all else.

That personalized experience is truly memorable when spontaneity and celebrity influence can effortlessly combine.

photo credit: www.flickr.com